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  1. Why microplastic debris may be the next big threat to our seas

    More than five trillion pieces of plastic debris are estimated to be in our oceans, though many are impossible to see with the naked eye.

    9th June 2017 01:27 PM

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  2. Lost ecosystem found buried in mud of southern California coastal waters

    Paleontologists investigating the sea bed off California have discovered a lost ecosystem that for thousands of years had nurtured communities of scallops and shelled marine organisms called...
  3. Finding new homes won't help emperor penguins cope with climate change

    Unlike other species that migrate successfully to escape the wrath of climate change, a new study shows that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as...
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    How the Arctic Ocean became saline

    The Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic. ...
  5. Why do Antarctic krill stocks fluctuate?

    It is only six centimeters long, but it plays a major role in the Antarctic ecosystem: the small crustacean Euphausia superba (Antarctic krill). It's one of the world's most abundant species and the...
  6. Domes of frozen methane may be warning signs for new blow-outs

    Several methane domes, some 500m wide, have been mapped on the Arctic Ocean floor. They may be signs of soon-to-happen methane expulsions that have previously created massive craters in a near-by...
  7. Marine reserves help mitigate against climate change, say scientists

    Highly protected marine reserves can help mitigate against the impacts of climate change, a study by a team of international scientists has concluded.

    5th June 2017 07:23 PM

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  8. What caused the most toxic algal bloom ever observed in Monterey Bay?

    In spring 2015, the West Coast of North America experienced one of the most toxic algal blooms on record. The bloom consisted of diatoms in the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, but researchers couldn't tell...
  9. Earliest human-made climate change took place 11,500 years ago

    A new study has uncovered the earliest known geological indications of humanmade climate change from 11,500 years ago.

    5th June 2017 03:00 PM

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  10. Massive craters formed by methane blow-outs from the Arctic sea floor

    Hundreds of massive, kilometer-wide craters on the ocean floor in the Arctic were formed by substantial methane expulsions, new research explains.

    1st June 2017 07:18 PM

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  11. Geoscientific evidence for subglacial lakes

    During the last glacial period -- when the ice in the Antarctic was far thicker and extended further offshore than it does today -- it has been speculated that subglacial lakes existed beneath it. An...
  12. Restored ocean will alleviate poverty, provide jobs, and improve health, finds report

    With climate change and social inequity addressed, restoring the ocean will help alleviate poverty, provide livelihoods, and improve the health of millions around the world.

    31st May 2017 05:33...
  13. Seacoast roads under new threat from rising sea level

    Some roads, as far as two miles from the shore, are facing a new hazard that currently cannot be seen by drivers -- rising groundwater caused by increasing ocean water levels.

    1st June 2017 04:40...
  14. Stony corals more resistant to climate change than thought

    Stony corals may be more resilient to ocean acidification than once thought, according to a Rutgers University study that shows they rely on proteins to help create their rock-hard skeletons.

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  15. Acidified ocean water widespread along North American West Coast

    A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with...
  16. Study highlights formation of beachrock in resisting climate-induced sea level rises

    Microorganisms play a crucial role in forming beachrock, a type of rock that forms on the beach and protects low-lying reef islands from erosion, a new study has revealed.

    31st May 2017 02:26 PM...
  17. More frequent extreme ocean warming could further endanger albatross

    As scientists grapple with the behavioral, ecological and evolutionary impacts of extreme climatic events, new research articles explore what is known on the topic and pioneer new approaches to this...
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    Previously, on Arctic warming

    Arctic warming occurred in the early 20th century due to the warming phases -- 'interdecadal variability mode' -- of both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, suggests new research.

    30th May 2017...
  19. Marine species distribution shifts will continue under ocean warming

    Scientists using a high-resolution global climate model and historical observations of species distributions on the Northeast US Shelf have found that commercially important species will continue to...
  20. Tiny shells indicate big changes to global carbon cycle

    Experiments with tiny, shelled organisms in the ocean suggest big changes to the global carbon cycle are underway, according to a new study.

    25th May 2017 08:13 PM

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  21. Why the Sumatra earthquake was so severe

    An international team of scientists has found evidence suggesting the dehydration of minerals deep below the ocean floor influenced the severity of the Sumatra earthquake, which took place on Dec....
  22. The birth and death of a tectonic plate

    A new technique to investigate the underwater volcanoes that produce Earth's tectonic plates has been developed by a geophysicist.

    24th May 2017 07:26 PM

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  23. Going with the flow: The forces that affect species' movements in a changing climate

    Ocean currents affect how climate change impacts movements of species to cooler regions. A new study provides novel insight into how species' distributions change from the interaction between climate...
  24. Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures

    Evidence from the age of the dinosaurs to today shows that chemical weathering of rocks is less sensitive to global temperature, and may depend on the steepness of the surface. The results call into...
  25. Transforming how complex marine data is synthesized

    Scientists are transforming how complex marine data from the Ocean Health Index is synthesized, communicated and used for coastal management.

    23rd May 2017 06:41 PM

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