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  1. Coral reefs in the Gulf of Aqaba may survive global warming, new study finds

    Coral reefs in the Red Sea’s Gulf of Aqaba can resist rising water temperatures, suggests new research. If they survive local pollution, these corals may one day be used to re-seed parts of the world...
  2. A super-algae to save our seas? Genetic engineering species to save corals

    Solutions to climate change, and particularly its effects on the ocean, are needed now more than ever. Coral bleaching caused by climate change is a huge threat to coral reefs. Recent extreme...
  3. Could sharks help save shipping industry billions?

    Whales, sharks, butterflies and lotus leaves might together hold the secret to saving the shipping industry millions and help save the planet, according to a marine biologist.

    20th July 2017...
  4. Ancient Italian fossils reveal risk of parasitic infections due to climate change

    In 2014, a team of researchers found that clams from the Holocene Epoch (that began 11,700 years ago) contained clues about how sea level rise due to climate change could foreshadow a rise in...
  5. Shifting storms to bring extreme waves, seaside damage to once placid areas

    The world's most extensive study of a major stormfront striking the coast has revealed a previously unrecognised danger from climate change: as storm patterns fluctuate, waterfront areas once thought...
  6. Sea temperature changes contributing to droughts

    Fluctuations in sea surface temperature are a factor in causing persistent droughts in North America and around the Mediterranean, new research suggests.

    19th July 2017 12:47 PM

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  7. Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamis

    Scientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia have discovered the world's most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known...
  8. Did life begin on land rather than in the sea?

    A new discovery pushes back the time for the emergence of microbial life on land by 580 million years and also bolsters a paradigm-shifting hypothesis that life began, not in the sea, but on land.
    ...
  9. Record-breaking marine heatwave powered by climate change cooks Tasmania's fisheries

    Climate change has warmed the waters east of Tasmania at four times the speed of the global average. But the heatwave of the southern summer of 2015/2016 was something exceptional, damaging fisheries...
  10. Key to speeding up carbon sequestration discovered

    The slow part of a chemical reaction that allows carbon to be sequestered in the ocean has now been identified by researchers, who have demonstrated how to speed it up with a common enzyme.

    17th...
  11. Stronger winds heat up West Antarctic ice melt

    Stronger winds 6000kms away on the East Antarctic, have generated waves that circle the continent at almost 700kmh. When these waves meet the steep underwater topography of the West Antarctic...
  12. Fossil site shows impact of early Jurassic's low oxygen oceans

    Using a combination of fossils and chemical markers, scientists have tracked how a period of globally low ocean-oxygen turned an Early Jurassic marine ecosystem into a stressed community inhabited by...
  13. Why Japan's coastal zones might be disappearing due to climate change

    Climate change can cause a range of effects on coastal environments, such as a decrease in sediment supply, changes in the intensity and frequency of extreme events, and changes in sea levels and...
  14. Deep-sea coral reefs discovery in depths of the North-Pacific

    Scientists had long believed that the waters of the Central and Northeast Pacific Ocean were inhospitable to certain species of deep-sea corals, but a marine biologist's discovery of an odd chain of...
  15. Mississippi mud may hold hope for Louisiana coast

    Mud, the most plentiful sediment type carried by the Mississippi River, may be the most powerful tool in building land to keep up sea level rise, suggests new research.

    13th July 2017 12:11 AM
    ...
  16. The one trillion tonne iceberg: Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

    A one trillion tonne iceberg -- one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice finally completed its path through the ice.
    ...
  17. Does the European public understand the impacts of climate change on the ocean?

    Although many are relatively well informed, an alarming number remain either uninformed or misinformed when it comes to the impacts of climate change on the ocean, a new in-depth study of the...
  18. Warm winter events in Arctic becoming more frequent, lasting longer

    Arctic winter warming events -- winter days where temperatures peak above 14 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 10 degrees Celsius) -- are a normal part of the climate over the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. But...
  19. 'Eelevator' project helps eels survive journey through New York waters

    An “eelevator” is helping American eels survive their harrowing journey from the Atlantic Ocean to the Hudson River and into rivers in or near New York City.

    10th July 2017 08:14 PM

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  20. Extreme coastal sea levels more likely to occur, new data, advanced modeling techniqu

    Improving projections for how much ocean levels may change in the future and what that means for coastal communities has vexed researchers studying sea level rise for years, but a new international...
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    Oil spill impacts in coastal wetland

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is still affecting wetland plants, a new study confirms. A paper explains how the presence of surface and buried crude oil under flooded and drained conditions affects...
  22. Surveying sea floor animals for offshore renewable energy

    Chunks of sediment from the ocean floor are being used by scientists to analyze animal life and determine environmental impact from offshore energy facilities.

    7th July 2017 01:58 PM

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    Sucking up spilt oil

    Spilt crude oil has repeatedly polluted and even destroyed marine ecosystems. An effective measure would be to remove spilt oil slicks by absorption into a separable solid phase. As scientists now...
  24. Extreme low-oxygen eddies in the Atlantic produce greenhouse gases

    In 2014, an international research team was able to investigate in detail eddies in the Atlantic Ocean which were characterized by extremely low oxygen concentrations. The interdisciplinary analysis...
  25. 'Weedy' fish species to take over our future oceans

    The ocean acidification expected in the future will reduce fish diversity significantly, with small ‘weedy’ species dominating marine environments, researchers have demonstrated for the first time. ...
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